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20110701
20110731
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think first of all the president realizes we have to get a big deal. as we discussed a couple of weeks ago or last week, charlie, if you don't send the appropriate signal to international financial communities, you can raise the debt ceiling but the interest costs are going to go through the roof. so it has to be a big deal and so i think he recognizes that. and i think speaker boehner subpoena looking at the reality of what's going to happen in 2013 without agreeing to what the president said. we're going to have 4.9% increases on taxes on everybody earning er $200,000 a year anyway just from the affordabl care act. so you'll see significant increase in taxes withoutany increased taxes put on the table. i think they can do a deal and i think a deal can get done if, in fact, we do take away a lot of the tax eendires and lower the rates so thatwe get an economic boom that would come a that. so i think it's still possible. i think things tend to happen in washington when they have to so my slope that something will come togher and occur. >> rose: how long do you think it will take? >> i
wantsto be speaker. his life. e highest priorit9 in he's achieved it. the other big difference john boehehr was once a committee chairman. he pushed legisla$ion throughl he knows how to make deals@at the coittee levels and he believes in the houseworkiwn. righting legislation in the hands of a tight-knit group of peoplea"ound the speake dennis hastert ntued that, nancy pelosi continued that. john boehner is unwinding that concentration of power, making the house a@differt place. >>i think he's got a ot. >> at @@becoming the president? >> yes. >> i don't see that, john. >> just thk about it. >> i just think there are other people are. >> his brand ofrepublicanism would carry. >> but i n't think has the@ -- either the bition or personality@todo that. >> he likes golf too ch! go on campaign trails. >> what about eisenhowe"? eisenhower liked golf a lot >> exit @@estion,@s hn boehner brout civili back to congress, yes or no?@ >> i think to a great @@extent. he is morealmer, asonable, rational guy. he done a good job dog that. >> he's la back, but he's representing a republican caulk tha
in the senate for us. how does austerity look for ordinary italians? >> the big weakness of this budget is it puts off some many of the cuts and tax increases until 2013, 2014. that is not coincidental. there is a general election in june 2013. all of this will have to be done by the next government. in the meantime, there is going to be a gaming tax, increased health charges, cuts in pensions, but only for the highest pensions -- and in italy, pensions are pretty generous. this is not a buethich in the ort-rm igoin to le anybody into destitution. >> in other news, syrian pro- democracy activists say government forces have killed at least nine people as protests against the president continue. reports indicate the military crackdown on opposition activists in damascus and hana. police have arrested members of opposition supporters. non-governmental organizations say at lea 160 people have been killed since the uprising began four months ago. 13 turkish soldiers have been killed in an attack in the southeast of the country. officials say kurdish militants ambushed troops. six soldiers we
-- it has big tax increases in it and all the spending cuts will happen in the out years. well, how many times do politicians think they can pull that one over on the american people? >> reporter: the split among republicans made it difficult for party leaders to determine just what might pass the house. whatever it turns out to be, it still must be acceptable to senate democrats and ultimately to the president. this morning, the senate's majority leader democrat harry reid challenged house speaker john boehner to take matters in hand. >> right now, i'm at a point where we need to hear from the house of representatives. we've planned to go forward over here, but until we hear from the house all our work is for naught. i await word from the speaker. >> reporter: in the meantime, there's general agreement that translating the complex gang of six plan into legislation and votes before august second, is likely unrealistic. that could put the short-term emphasis back on a senate backup plan to let the president raise the debt ceiling on his own pending some final, long-term agreement. >> ifil
economies, into small businesses, communities, equipment, materials. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: once again today, debt-laden governments in europe grappled with massive public anger over austerity measures they'd imposed. in greece, the government won a bitter struggle today to rein in debt for bailout help. and in britain, civil servants took the streets. a tense calm returned to athens, greece today, but shards of glass lay strewn on the sidewalks and charred debris was stacked in the streets. they were the remnants of riots that raged into the night as protesters set fires and battled police, who fought back with clouds of tear gas. even so, the greek parliament voted today t
, to the red, white, and blue. in the big apple and elsewhere, the day will end with the usual bursts of color, lighting the night sky-- a once-a-year moment, cherished by millions. but, in some places, this year, the sky will be silent. raging wildfires and dry weather in arizona, new mexico, and texas have forced authorities to cancel fourth of july fireworks in certain areas. >> a lot of people are going to be really disappointed, i thinkç >> woodruff: the patriotic spirit isn't felt only in the united states. these u.s. soldiers stationed in southeastern afghanistan held a flag raising ceremony to commemorate the 4th. and at kandahar airfield general david petraeus spent his last independence day as commander of u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan, with the troops. petraeus set to take up his new job as c.i.a. director later this year, today administered the oath of re-enlistment to 235 service members.çç >> you can really feel the honor, especially when you get a general like general petreas come down and do it for us. it makes it really feel a lot more important to me. it'll be nice
. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: high-level democrats and republicans alike said today's meeting at the white house marked the beginning of the end game in reaching a final deal on deficit reduction. the president and congressional leaders convened in the white house cabinet room, amid talk of a grand bargain involving social security, medicare and tax reform. when it was over, mr. obama made an unscheduled appearance in the briefing room. >> i thought it was a very constructive meeting. people were frank. we discussed the various options available to us. everybody re-confirmed the importance of completing our work and raising the debt limit ceiling so that the full faith and credit of the un
a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the debt ceiling deadlock in washington led to increasingly urgent appeals for action today. but even as talks resumed, white house officials warned not to expect a hallelujah moment. fresh alarms sounded on wall street and around the world today about the consequences of a potential u.s. government default. standard & poors joined moody's in warning the country's credit rating could be downgraded, if the government tries to pay just the interest on its debt. and china said it hopes the u.s. adopts responsible policies. the chinese hold more than $1 trillion in u.s. debt, more than any other foreign creditor. at a senate hearing, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke-- t
. even american banks have almost $300 billion. is italy too big to fail? >> well, certainly it is. i mean, if you have to think about a rescue package for italy no one today has the money to put it up. i mean, let's face it, as you said before, italy is six times the size of greece. so i think that everybody should be quite calm. today the markets were doing much better. it's true, as ken was saying before, part of the confusion arose because of a fight over an internal political fight between berlusconi and finance minister tremonte. but the decree for a large austerity plan was already passed. and it was because of this fight that the markets feared that maybe this decree was not going to be approved by parliament. today the situation has been clarified. by friday this package will be passed and, you know, italy is going to go on by adopting this plan and by 2014 it will have a balanced budget which is going to be quite an enviable situation if all of this will go according to plan. >> suarez: professor rogoff, the news of the austerity plan seemed to have calmed really jittery mar
of either of our two parties right now. and i think that is the big challenge right now. how do we basically develop a political platform and a mandate to do those four things. >> i would add a couple things. to what tom said which i basically agree with. but first there is a cultural element here. it's not just a problem in washington, it's a pblem in the culture. a nation where people have distrust of authority, don't trust government, unwilling to accept sacrice, feel very threatened, want pore government than they are willing to pay for, and so there has to be a gigantic education campaign to go under that. and then the second thing i would add, and tom talked about a hybrid politics, i uld say we'vead it. and we just have to rediscover it. and i go back perpeally to my hero alex aner hamilton who created this hrid politics it was not -- he got us out of the big government versus small government debat he stood for lited b energetic government to enhance social mobility. so people in the hamiltonian practise decision which include the wig party and the lincoln an republican party at the
planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: much talk, but little movement: the high-stakes debt and deficit impasse continued today, and last night's dueling primetime speeches by president obama and speaker boehner only seemed to reinforce the bitter stalemate over raising the country's borrowing limit. newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: it was house speaker john boehner who had the last word
on the show time series the big c. here's a look at that series. >> the doctor. oh, pardon me, sir. dr. sherman, hi. my name's kathy. >> i'm the nurse. >> you're not a drug rap, are you? >> no, no, i'm not. i'm a dying woman who is trying to see the right doctor and ask him if he s any advice on how to save my life. the best i can do is spend the last two hours a day on hold from your office to find out if anyone's canceled. that's not okay. >> i'm going to asyou to leave. >> i will not leave. >> charlie: the big c is currently airing on show time mondays at 10:30 p.m. i'm pleased to have laura lean -- laura linney back at this table. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: when you look at that, what do you think? >> it's a weird, you know sort of tapestry of what you feel and i always feel slightly embarrassed when i look at myself. >> charlie: really? you don't look at this clinically and say i can't wait to have somebody watch it. >> i also good off camera. i give performances off camera to people who would never -- i mean, on camera i try my best. but there's, the further i get awa
think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: another blistering forecast greeted millions of americans today. the unrelenting hot weather broke a series of records, and triggered warnings in state after state. >> judging by the -- large portions of the country the sweating is way from over with temperatures over 100 degrees and above. >> how hot do you think it is. >> 109. >> in wichita, a high yesterday of 111 degrees, breaking a record set in 1982. it was expected to hit 103 today, the 20th straight day of t
. and this going on in washington is a big part of the reason why. before i served in congress i ran a small business in ohio. i was amazed at how different washington d.c. operated than every other business in america. where most american businesses make the hard choices to pay their bills, live within their means. in washington, more spending and more debt is business as usual. well, i've got news for washington, those days are over. president obama came to congress in january and requested businesses as usual. he had ner routine increase in the national debt, but we in the house said not so fast. here was a president asking for the largest debt increase in american history on the heels of the largest spending binge in american history. and here's what we got for that massive spending binge. a new health-care bill that most americans never asked for. a stimulus bill that's more effective in producing material for late night comedians than it was in producing jobs. and a national debt that has gotten so out of hand it sparked a crisis without precedent in my lifetime or yours. the united st
on the pc market and that is not the biggest growth area. it's a big growth is in the mobile sector and not in the pc market which had to lower the expectations for the pc business for the months ahead. there is a mixed outlook and that is the reason why the stock of intel is losing in the thursday session. >> what other shares or stories are standing out in the session? >> basically, we got extremely good numbers if you compare them to expectations from morgan stanley, the last big american bank to come out with earnings. the stock is trading up by 1.9%. that helps to support financial stocks and wall street. we had a pretty gloomy outlook from pepsi. they had decent numbers for the past but the outlook is a bit disappointing. that stock is one of the bigger losers with a drop of about 5%. >> thank you very much. staying with earnings, things are looking up for american express. cardholders spendnd record amount in the second quarter of this year and that sent profits surging to over $1.3 billion. this was a bit of a comeback. many corporate clients cut back on spending during busi
greece in hopes of protecting big ones. >> the threat today is for the whole eurozone, so we need to find a solution. >> ministers signed off on what they hope will be part of the new solution, the new bailout fund that will kick in from 2013, but as they all know, a lot could change before then. >> our brussels correspondent has been following the discussions by the eurozone finance ministers in brussels. can you tell us what has come out of today's debt crisis talks? >> the formal agreement on anything has now been pushed back into another meeting of finance ministers later this month, but they have been discussing a lot. of course, the focus has been on greece and the question of a second bailout for greece. is it possible? how much will be needed? when will it be triggered? and, crucially, should private bondholders take their share responsibly? should there be obliged to extend their lines of credit to greece to put off the evil day when they will need a second bailout and call in their dead? the ecb, the european central bank, thinks that is stretching it to try to get that agreemen
. >> afghanistan off page one. iraq is on page one? >> in the ends of july, this is going to be up this big on page one finish they're in the deal. he's got to -- [everyone talking at once] >> unemployment rate on page one! >> if the unemployment rate comes out high, it will be the lead story in the newspaper, hn. >> it will dominate the story that we just had? >> it will dominate if for a couple days. >> there will be a deal. >> there will be a deal? >> and there will be a deal and neither side will be happy. each side will give the other side something. they're -- >> not the taxes. that won't be part of the deal. taxes will not be part of the deal. >> what do you 90. >> tax revenues -- [everyone talking at once] >> they'll find something, i think, to agree on finally. i don't know whether it will be on august 2 or august 5th. but unemployment rate is not off the front pages. unemployment is -- on the number-one issue in 20% of american names. you have the biggest unemployment we've had since the great despres in real terms that. is what will kill obama's prospects if he doesn't do something about
of reasons for this we can discuss-- is as high as it's been. >> rose: so that's really one of the big questions. >> in europe it's the same thing. >> rose: u.s. leadership. >> yeah. >> rose: what is it you thi they expect from the united states in 2011 and twelve after all that's taken place? the economic collapse that we had. the wars we were engaged in and two that we are still engaged in in different levels. what does the world want from america? >> well, leadersh, i think, is the short answer to the question. but we can start with asia and go to europe and go to the middle east. in asia, they want the ited states to be present. they wanthe united states that ey can count on to meet its obligations anpromises t ales and partners, and we have been doing that. you know, this is a mistake... not mistake. it's not a coincidence that secretary clinton took her first trip as secretary of state to asia. >> rose: and she's back in india as we speak. since dean rusk in 1961. and we have really engaged... they want u.s. presence. i think the asians want to see the unitedtates engaged and, by
to create the next big thing? but make sure that production is here. >> brown: it was the third such social media event for the president this year. in april, he took part in a town hall hosted by facebook, and in january, he answered video questions submittedia youtube. for the president and other politicians and leaders, twitter especially has become an increasingly essential communications tool. republican mitt romney used the service in early june to announce to his followers he was running for president. and then, to keep them in the loop about campaign events. and with more than half a million followers, former vice presidential candidate sarah palin is a frequent user, sometimes posting multiple times a day. but there are also cautionary tales including, most recently, congressman anthony weiner, whose tweeted sexual messages and photos opened him to ridicule and ended in his resignation. >> now, our next question comes from someone you may know-- this is speaker boehner. >> oh, there you go. ( laughter ) >> brown: as for today's town hall, some of the president's political opponents
, into small businesses, communities, equipment, materials. >> that money could make a big differen to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it was decision day in the house of representatives today as speaker john boehner faced a key test of his leadership, four days before the u.s. government could face default. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: house republicans pushed forward with a vote today on the speaker's plan, even as the measure faced a white house veto threat and a firm wall of opposition in the democratic- controlled senate. boehner's plan would cut the deficit by $917 billion over the next decade by capping the budgets of federal agencies. the proposal would also raise the de
rainfall over today as well. so big concern here. it's going to be turning very stormy. this forecast path taking towards the north a little more over the course of today. then it veers out quickly and heads toward the east. but this is going to be a slow-moving system. a wide area is going to be impacted. and we are going to continue to see that stormy weather over the next couple of days. of course plenty of -- and we're talking about damaging winds, dangerous surf conditions and the possibility of landslides and flooding. as much as 800 millimeters for this section. some of these areas have seen a lot of rainfall in the past 24 hours too. so amounts are easily going to hit almost a meter high. very wet conditions. do want to watch out for over the next few days. >> thank you very much. we'll keep checking in for the latest updates on that. >>> now, three prefectures in northeastern japan have identified more farms that shipped contaminated beef. seven farms fed their cattle straw that had been left outdoors after the march nuclear accidents at the fukushima daiichi plant. the straw was
-- there are loopholes they need to close. but charles' point is white. these are tiny, tiny little drops in a big ocean. there inot enough in corporate jets or even the hedge fund guys, although i would like to. they have to raise revenues, i hate to say it, on the middle class. this is the point that gets lost on this. everybody is in this boat. there is no way out of it unless every single american does something. >> raise revenues on the shrinking middle class, mark. >> everybody is in it, and evan is right -- evan addressed the possibility of default. when that happens, the federal government of the united states, which bars or 40 cents of every dollar we spend every single day, is faced with the option -- do you pay a sergeant in combat in kandahar, a grandmother with a 1-bedroom apartment in social security check, or to meet the obligations of bankers who are holding their debt in beijing and beverly hills? the answer is simple. the prior claim is on the second group. the reality is we are talking about -- the president is proposing increasing taxes, revenues, by 1% over the next 10 years. $400 b
made similar decisions. i mean, the big difference between them... >>. >> rose: she was more hard line than he was and it'said she is even today in the councils of government. that she was more allied with bob gates than she was... >> yeah, that was the big difference during the campaign between them and that was what got oba doing soell in iowa was his rly opposition. >> rose: she supported the war even though it was just based on a speech that he'd written. so the last question is what's it going to take so that this is no longer true? >> think that it's going to be with us, charlie, for a very, very long time. and the reason i say that is that as the years go by it isn't that apresident has to think about vietnam, because vietnam has now insinuated itself int the d.n.a. of every presidt. now you think of code words. you think out having a clear exit strategy. >> rose: right. >> of giving clear instructions to the military. what are you really saying? you're really saying "i don't want another vietnam," but you don't articulate the word. you live the thought, the very essence of it.
of connection with you. >> we looked at the... the whole context, and was there someone trying to big note themselves by suggesting their connection to us? we don't have sources that we know about. and i had never heard the name bradley manning before. i never heard the name bradass87 before. ( applause ) >> smith: at a major conference last year, assange was also asked if manning was his source for the video and the cables. >> there's been this us intelligence analyst, bradley manning, arrested, and it's alleged that he professed in a chat room that he leaked this video to you, along with 280,000 classified us embassy cables. i mean, did he? >> we have denied receiving those cables. >> smith: assange was facing a dilemma. if wikileaks acknowledged having more documents alleged to have come from manning, he risked further harm to his source. did you discuss internally, amongst yourselves, whether or not the war logs and eventually the cables could further jeopardize him? >> there was discussion about, you know, we have a situation where there is a young man held in military prison under in
? >> there is a potential connection in the sense that if the u.s. were to default, we would see a big spike in long- term interest rates, so that would affect mortgage rates. it would affect car lending rates. it would affect business lending rates. so all of that could be quite problematic for the whole economy. so that's why, you know, certainly the treasury department and one has to say the federal reserve as well very worried about this. and want to avoid this at all costs. >> ifill: does it have to actually occur or is merely this delay, this debate, is that already putting its own drag on these areas of the economy? >> well, so far i say the uncertainty about what is exactly going to happen, what's going to get cut, what could be affected is giving a lot of consumers and businesses pause, if you will, making it quite risk-averse. and one of the reasons we're going through a soft patch, it's not the only reason, one of the reasons is this uncertainty. and what is triggering is risk aversion on the part of businesses and consumers. so already in a sense they're anticipating or worried about what migh
speaking, it's a big blow for the karzai administration. you know, it'sçç confidant, relatives, high-level aides going back into april some of them are being killed. but more than who is doing it or who it's happening to, i would put it altogether by saying it's a real danger for the stability of the government and it makes it seem as if as the americans and nato begin to pull out, it's really not clear who is in control. it's really not clear where these chips are going to fall. >> you wrote aboutç that ioç oe of the recent pieces for the post that the tenor of kabul is changing. people seem to be preparing for that day when the last u.s. troops are out of there and trying to figure out where the power is going to be. >> exactly. people are very nervous and scared. the last time a super power was involved in afghanistan and suddenly left, which was of course the soviet union in 1989, it wasn't long after that that civil wary rupted which was incredibly vicious and destructive and destroyed much of the capital. nobody thinks that's going to happen now but they're worriedç that s
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)